Quiz  |  Polls  |  Parties  | 
Answer ThisAnswer this

More Popular Issues

See how voters are siding on other popular political issues...

Should the Irish language remain a compulsory subject on the national curriculum?

Results

Last answered 16 minutes ago

Irish Language Curriculum Poll Results

Yes

1,930 votes

45%

No

2,367 votes

55%

Distribution of answers submitted by Irish voters.

1 Yes answers
1 No answers
0 overlapping answers

Data includes total votes submitted by visitors since May 30, 2017. For users that answer more than once (yes we know), only their most recent answer is counted in the total results. Total percentages may not add up to exactly 100% as we allow users to submit "grey area" stances that may not be categorized into yes/no stances.

Choose a demographic filter

State

City

Party

Ideology

Website

Yes No Importance

Data based on 30-day moving average to reduce daily variance from traffic sources. Totals may not add up to exactly 100% as we allow users to submit "grey area" stances that may not be categorized into yes/no stances.

Learn more about Irish Language Curriculum

Irish is given recognition by the Irish Constitution as the national and first official language of the Republic of Ireland (English is the other official language). Although the Irish requirement was also dropped for wider public service jobs, Irish remains a required subject of study in all schools within the Republic which receive public money. Those wishing to teach in primary schools in the State must also pass a compulsory examination called Scrúdú Cáilíochta sa Ghaeilge (Examination for Quality in Irish). The need for a pass in Leaving Certificate Irish or English for entry to an Garda Síochána (police) was introduced in September 2005, and recruits are given lessons in the language during their two years of training. The most important official documents of the Irish government must be published in both Irish and English or Irish alone (in accordance with the Official Languages Act 2003, enforced by An Coimisinéir Teanga, the Irish language ombudsman).  See recent Irish Language Curriculum news

Discuss this issue...